Relative dating vs radioactive dating

Neutron-poor nuclides with atomic numbers less than 83 tend to decay by either electron capture or positron emission.Many of these nuclides decay by both routes, but positron emission is more often observed in the lighter nuclides, such as A third mode of decay is observed in neutron-poor nuclides that have atomic numbers larger than 83.The mass defect of an atom reflects the stability of the nucleus.

Consider what happens during the -decay of The difference between the mass of an atom and the sum of the masses of its protons, neutrons, and electrons is called the mass defect.The solid line represents a neutron to proton ratio of 1:1.Neutron-poor nuclides decay by modes that convert a proton into a neutron.The excess energy associated with this excited state is released when the nucleus emits a photon in the -ray portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.Most of the time, the -ray is emitted within 10Nuclides with atomic numbers of 90 or more undergo a form of radioactive decay known as spontaneous fission in which the parent nucleus splits into a pair of smaller nuclei.The binding energy can also be viewed as the amount of energy it would take to rip the nucleus apart to form isolated neutrons and protons.

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